The Reused Animation Guide


This section of Misce-Looney-Ous serves as a definitive guide to the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies shorts that reused animation from earlier films.

As a way of saving time and money, cartoon studios reused animation drawings from earlier shorts in new cartoons. At Warner Bros., this practice was most frequently employed during the 1930s (the Great Depression era). It began to decline somewhat during the 1940s and, with Bob Clampett's departue in 1946, its use fell drastically. By the 1960s, reusing animation was overshadowed by other cost-cutting methods. Yet, it was still used a few times during this decade.

A distinction should be made between reused animation and reused gags. Reusing animation, as discussed above, means reusing older animation drawings for a new cartoon. By contrast, to reuse a gag means that only a certain scene from an earlier cartoon is reused without using any animation drawings from previous shorts (the material is completely new).



Index:

1930s | 1940s | 1950s | 1960s | Misc.


1930s


"The Tree's Knees" (1931/Harman-Ising):
  • "Congo Jazz" (1930): The pelicans sequence.


    "Congo Jazz" (left), "The Tree's Knees" (right)


    "Smile, Darn Ya, Smile!" (1931/Ising-Marsales):
  • "Sinkin' in the Bathtub" (1930): Animation of the cow blocking the road.
  • "Box Car Blues" (1930): The sequence with the trolley going through the tunnel and out of control.

    "One More Time" (1931/Ising):
  • "Ups 'N Downs" (1931): Animation of the mechanical horse.

    "You Don't Know What You're Doin'!" (1931/Ising):
  • "Lady, Play Your Mandolin!" (1931): Animation of the drunk horse (here redrawn as a dog) screaming.


    "Lady, Play Your Mandolin!" (left), "You Don't Know What You're Doin'!" (right)


    "Bosko's Soda Fountain" (1931/Ising):
  • "Smile, Darn Ya, Smile!" (1931): Animation of the obese hippo.
  • "Bosko's Holiday" (1931): Sequence with the phone that tries to get Bosko's attention.

    "Bosko's Fox Hunt" (1931/Harman):
  • "Lady, Play Your Mandolin!" (1931): Animation of Foxy (here redrawn as Bosko) riding the horse.
  • "Ups 'N Downs" (1931): Sequences involving other horse riders including the obese hippo (here redrawn as an elephant) riding a skinny horse.


    "Lady, Play Your Mandolin!" (left), "Bosko's Fox Hunt" (right)



    "Ups 'N Downs" (left), "Bosko's Fox Hunt" (right)


    "Bosko at the Zoo" (1932/Harman):
  • "Congo Jazz" (1930): The whole sequence with Bosko petting the monkey, the monkey spitting in his eyes, Bosko spanking the monkey, and the gorilla appearing behind Bosko as well as the animation of the pelicans.
  • "Big Man from the North" (1930): Animation of the beavers.
  • "Bosko Shipwrecked!" (1931): Animation of the lion chasing Bosko.

    "Pagan Moon" (1932/Ising):
  • "Bosko at the Zoo" (1932): The sequence with the angry fish.

    "Battling Bosko" (1932/Harman):
  • "Ups 'N Downs" (1931): Animation of the small crowd and the hippo that constantly shouts "Come on Bosko!".

    "Crosby, Columbo, and Vallee" (1932/Ising):
  • "Hittin' the Trail for Hallelujah Land" (1931): The "waterfall staircase" sequence.

    "Goopy Geer" (1932/Ising):
  • "Lady, Play Your Mandolin!" (1931): Animation of the ape waiter, the Joe E. Brown hippo, the drunk horse, and a few background characters.
  • "Bosko's Party" (1932): Additional background characters.


    "Lady, Play Your Mandolin!" (left), "Goopy Geer" (right)


    "It's Got Me Again" (1932/Ising):
  • "Hold Anything" (1930): Sequence with the mice marching to the tune of "Yankee Doodle".

    "Bosko and Bruno" (1932/Harman):
  • "Box Car Blues" (1930): Animation of the box car that Bosko and Bruno ride on going out of control.


    "Box Car Blues" (left), "Bosko and Bruno" (right)


    "Bosko and Honey"/"Bosko's Dizzy Date" (1932/Harman):
  • "Bosko's Holiday" (1931): Animation of a tired Bosko answering the phone and the "famous" sandwhich bit.
  • "Bosko's Soda Fountain" (1931): Sequence with Bosko and Honey on the phone.
  • "Sinkin' in the Bathtub" (1930): Bosko playing "I'm forever blowing bubbles" on his sax, while Honey dances on the bubbles.
  • "Bosko's Fox Hunt" (1931): Scenes of Bruno getting struck with lightning in the rear and getting kicked by a tree.
  • "Bosko at the Zoo" (1932): Sequence with Bosko and Honey on a bike singing."
  • "Bosko and Bruno" (1932): The chicken running away from Bosko and Honey's bike and the cow that Honey lands on.

    "Bosko's Dog Race" (1932/Harman):
  • "Bosko's Fox Hunt" (1931): Sequence with Bosko and Bruno chasing the fox and animation of the dogs running.
  • "Battling Bosko" (1932): Animation of the paper boy.

    "I Love a Parade" (1932/Ising):
  • "Battling Bosko" (1932): Animation of the tattooed man's tattoo of a large ship sinking on his chest.
  • "Red-Headed Baby" (1931): The clown screaming towards the camera.
  • "Ups 'N Downs" (1931): The scene of the ostrich trying to look at the show but is slingshot in the backside letting mice in each time.

    "Bosko's Store" (1932/Harman):
  • "Bosko's Soda Fountain" (1931): The dauchsund sniffing around entering Bosko's store.

    "Bosko the Lumberjack" (1932/Harman):
  • "Bosko's Holiday" (1931): The "famous" sandwhich scene (again).
  • "Hittin' the Trail for Hallelujah Land" (1931): The "waterfall staircase" sequence.

    "Ride Him, Bosko!" (1932/Harman):
  • "Moonlight for Two" (1932): Animation of the sqaure dancing characters.

    "Bosko's Woodland Daze" (1932/Harman):
  • "Bosko's Dog Race" (1932): The animation of Bruno emerging from the water with a cup on his head.

    "Bosko the Drawback" (1932/Harman):
  • "Freddy the Freshman" (1932): Various football sequences.


    "Freddy the Freshman" (left), "Bosko the Drawback" (right)


    "The Shanty Where Santy Claus Lives" (1933/Ising):
  • "Red-Headed Baby" (1931): Animation of the Red-Headed Baby and two African American dolls singing and a few background toys.

    "Bosko in Dutch" (1933/Harman-Freleng):
  • "Red-Headed Baby" (1932): Animation of Goopy Geer dancing.
  • "Yodeling Yokels" (1931): The block of ice that the twins are on.

    "Bosko the Speed King" (1933/Harman):
  • "Ups 'N Downs" (1931): Animation of the crowd cheering.

    "I Like Mountain Music" (1933/Ising):
  • "Pagan Moon" (1932): Animation of the Hawaiian dancing girl.
  • "Red-Headed Baby" (1932): Animation of the toys cheering.

    "Bosko the Sheep-Herder" (1933/Harman):
  • "Bosko's Holiday" (1931): Sandwhich sequence (again).
  • "Bosko's Fox Hunt" (1931): Animation of Bosko and Bruno fighting in the cave.

    "We're in the Money" (1933/Ising):
  • "A Great Big Bunch of You" (1932): Animation of the mannequin.

    "Bosko's Knight-Mare" (1933/Harman):
  • "Ride Him, Bosko!" (1932): Animation of Bosko dancing.

    "Beau Bosko" (1933/Harman-Freleng):
  • "Freddy the Freshman" (1932): Animation of the legionaires' "dog pile".

    "Bosko the Musketeer" (1933/Harman):
  • "Three's a Crowd" (1932): Animation of the musketeers singing.
  • "Bosko's Woodland Daze" (1932): Bruno frolicking and looking at a tree with interest.
  • "Bosko in Person" (1933): Animation of Honey dancing.

    "Bosko's Picture Show" (1933/Harman-Freleng):
  • "Bosko's Dog Race" (1932): Animation of the dogs racing.
  • "Bosko and Bruno" (1932): The box car going out of control alongside the cliff.

    "Buddy the Gob" (1934/Freleng):
  • "It's Got Me Again" (1932): Animation of the mice performing a drum roll.

    "Buddy's Circus" (1934/King):
  • "Buddy's Showboat" (1933): Animation of the crowd entering to see the show.

    "Why Do I Dream Those Dreams?" (1934/Freleng):
  • "Beauty and the Beast" (1934): Animation of the penguins (here redrawn as dwarves) dancing.

    "Viva Buddy" (1934/King):
  • "How Do I Know It's Sunday?" (1934): Animation of the lobster (here redrawn as Cookie) dancing.

    "Mr. and Mrs. is the Name" (1935/Freleng):
  • "How Do I Know It's Sunday" (1934): Animation of the dancing crab.

    "Buddy's Theatre" (1935/Hardaway):
  • "Buddy the Gob" (1934): Animation of the navy ships heading towards the camera.

    "Rhythm in the Bow" (1935/Hardaway):
  • "Bosko and Bruno" (1932): Animation of the train.

    "A Cartoonist's Nightmare" (1935/King):
  • "Mr. and Mrs. is the Name" (1935): Some pieces of animation of the octopus.

    "Into Your Dance" (1935/Freleng):
  • "Buddy's Lost World" (1935): Animation of the crowd greeting the boat at the dock.
  • "Shake Your Powder Puff" (1934): Animation of some of the animals playing instruments and scenes of the crowd.
  • "Buddy's Showboat" (1933): Animation of the crowd entering to see the show.

    "Buddy the Gee Man" (1935/King):
  • "Buddy the Gob" (1934): Animation of Buddy walking on the heads of small-to-large characters within a crowd.

    "Hollywood Capers" (1935/King):
  • "Those Were Wonderful Days" (1934): Animation of the man at the cash regiester.
  • "Buddy's Beer Garden" (1933): Scene of the bartender putting fresh mugs of beer on the counter.

    "The Fire Alarm" (1935/King):
  • "Sittin' on the Backyard Fence" (1933): Animation of a fireman's nose enlarging as he snores and his pants blowing in the wind.

    "Billboard Frolics" (1935/Freleng):
  • "How Do I Know It's Sunday?" (1934): Animation of the Dutch Cleanser and the singing tamales.
  • "Beauty and the Beast" (1934): Animation of the roller-skating ducks (redrawn here as penguins).
  • "The Girl at the Ironing Board" (1934): Animation of the dancing long-johns.
  • "The Miller's Daughter" (1934): Sequence with the girl doing the rumba.

    "I'm a Big Shot Now" (1936/Freleng):
  • "Along Flirtation Walk" (1935): Sequence with the birds dancing.

    "Let It Be Me" (1936/Freleng):
  • "I Wish I Had Wings" (1932): Animation of the hen hiding something from the rooster.

    "Toy Town Hall" (1936/Freleng):
  • "Those Beautiful Dames" (1934): Animation of the elephant turning on a light and the soldiers trumpeting horns.
  • "Beauty ands the Beast" (1934): Animation of the soldiers marching.
  • "Let It Be Me" (1936): Animation of the Bing Crosby bird singing "Let It Be Me".
  • "Billboard Frolics" (1935): Animation of Eddie Cantor singing "Merrily We Roll Along".
  • "The Merry Old Soul" (1935): Animation of the three fiddlers.
  • "The Lady In Red" (1935): Animation of Rudy Vallee, the Mexican singers, and the Lady in Red.
  • "My Green Fedora" (1935): Sequence with the Joe Penner rabbit singing "I'm Wearin' My Green Fedora".

    "Porky's Moving Day" (1936/King):
  • "Porky's Pet" (1936): Some animation of Lulu the Ostrich.

    "Milk and Money" (1936/Avery):
  • "Porky the Rain Maker" (1936): Porky's poppa pacing back and forth.

    "The Coo Coo Nut Grove" (1936/Freleng):
  • "At Your Service Madame" (1936): Some animation pieces of the W.C. Fields pig.
  • "I'm a Big Shot Now" (1936): Animation of the two birds (here redrawn as George Arliss and Mae West) dancing.
  • "Along Flirtation Walk" (1935): Sequence with the birds dancing.

    "Pigs is Pigs" (1937/Freleng):
  • "At Your Service Madame" (1936): Animation of Piggie running down the stairs to breakfast.

    "Picador Porky" (1937/Avery):
  • "The Miller's Daughter" (1934): Sequence with the girl doing the rumba.

    "Porky's Romance" (1937/Tashlin):
  • "Honeymoon Hotel" (1934): The shoes tied to the back of Porky and Petunia's car.

    "Clean Pastures" (1937/Freleng):
  • "Sunday Go to Meetin' Time" (1936): Animation of the black couple "jiving" their way to heaven.
  • "Goin' to Heaven on a Mule" (1934): Animation of everyone in heaven flying around and enjoying themselves.

    "Uncle Tom's Bungalow" (1937/Avery):
  • "Milk and Money" (1936): Various pieces of animation with Simon Simon Leegree/Mr. Viper.

    "Streamlined Greta Green" (1937/Freleng):
  • "Bosko and Bruno" (1932): Animation of the train.

    "Porky's Railroad" (1937/Tashlin):
  • "Bosko and Bruno" (1932): Animation of the train.

    "Dog Daze" (1937/Freleng):
  • "I Haven't Got a Hat" (1935): Animation of Little Kitty (here redrawn as a pup) reciting "Mary Had A Little Lamb".

    "Speaking of the Weather" (1937/Tashlin):
  • "The Coo-Coo Nut Grove" (1936): The caricatures of Ned Sparks, Hugh Herbert, and Tarzan.
  • "The Miller's Daughter" (1934): The pot "tooting" and the dancers waltzing.
  • "Those Were Wonderful Days" (1934): The boxers Kilrain and Sullivan waltzing.
  • "Flowers for Madame" (1935): Animation of the dancing flowers.
  • "Toy Town Hall" (1936): Animation of the toys cheering.
  • "I've Got to Sing a Torch Song" (1933): Animation of the Boswell Sisters.
  • "Buddy's Beer Garden" (1933): Animation of the tongue sandwiches.
  • "How Do I Know It's Sunday?" (1934): Animation of the dancing lobster.
  • "Porky in the North Woods" (1936): Animation of the animals running.
  • "Buddy of the Apes" (1934): Animation of the African natives running towards the camera.
  • "Buddy the Gob" (1934): Animation of the navy ships heading toward the camera.
  • "Ride Him, Bosko!" (1932): Animation of the cowboys running toward the camera.
  • "Sunday Go to Meetin' Time" (1936): The pinball gag sequence.


    "Those Were Wonderful Days" (left), "Speaking of the Weather" (right)



    "Ride Him, Bosko!" (left), "Speaking of the Weather" (right)



    "Buddy of the Apes" (left), "Speaking of the Weather" (right)


    "The Woods Are Full of Cuckoos" (1937/Tashlin):
  • "The Coo-Coo Nut Grove" (1936): Animation of Ben Birdie.
  • "My Green Fedora" (1935): Sequence with the Joe Penner rabbit (here redrawn as a penguin) singing "I'm Wearin' My Green Fedora".

    "Porky's Double Trouble" (1937/Tashlin):
  • "The Blow Out" (1936): Sequences with the cops talking on radio phones and police cars heading for the camera.
  • "I'm a Big Shot Now" (1936): Animation of the cop shooting at the Killer and getting forced into the ground by the motion of the machine gun.

    "September in the Rain" (1937/Freleng):
  • "Flowers for Madame" (1935): Animation of the Scottish dancing weeds.
  • "Billboard Frolics" (1935): Animation of the baby chicks chasing the worm.
  • "Clean Pastures" (1937): Some animation pieces of Al Jolson.
  • "How Do I Know It's Sunday?" (1934): The "By a Waterfall" duet and the "search light" gag.

    "Daffy Duck and Egghead" (1938/Avery):
  • "Porky's Duck Hunt" (1937): Animation of Daffy's screwy hop.

    "My Little Buckaroo" (1938/Freleng):
  • "Sweet Sioux" (1937): Animation of horses that the posse rides on.
  • "I Wanna Play House" (1936): The side-cliff sequences.

    "Jungle Jitters" (1938/Freleng):
  • "Sweet Sioux" (1937): The "Merry-Go-Round" sequence with the Indians redrawn as African natives.

    "What Price Porky?" (1938/Clampett):
  • "Porky's Duck Hunt" (1937): Animation of Daffy's screwy hop.
  • "Buddy the Gob" (1934): Animation of the navy ships (here redrawn as ducks).

    "Porky and Daffy" (1938/Clampett):
  • "Buddy's Showboat" (1933): Animation of the crowd entering to see the show.

    "Porky's Phony Express" (1938/Howard-Dalton):
  • "Sweet Sioux" (1937): Animation of the Indians running toward the camera.

    "Have You Got Any Castles?" (1938/Tashlin):
  • "Clean Pastures" (1937): Animation of the black tap dancer, Fats Waller, Cab Calloway, and the black dancing girls.
  • "Speaking of the Weather" (1937): Animation of the thin man and the Indian snake charmer.
  • "Little Beau Porky" (1936): Some animation pieces of the French foreign legion.

    "The Isle of Pingo-Pongo" (1938/Avery):
  • "Clean Pastures" (1937): Animation of the black dancing girls.

    "Katnip Kollege" (1938/Hardaway-Dalton):
  • "Along Flirtation Walk" (1935): Animation of dancing birds (here redrawn as cats).

    "Porky's Naughty Nephew" (1938/Clampett):
  • "Pettin' in the Park" (1934): Animation of the ostrich and pelican in the race.

    "You're an Education" (1938/Tashlin):
  • "The Miller's Daughter" (1934): Animation of the girl doing the rumba and the waltzing couple.
  • "Little Dutch Plate" (1934): Animation of the Dutch boy and girl dancing.
  • "Flowers for Madame" (1935): Animation of the flowers doing a Scottish jig.

    "A-Lad-In Bagdad" (1938/Howard-Dalton):
  • "My Green Fedora" (1935): Sequence with the Joe Penner rabbit (here redrawn as Egghead) singing.

    "The Lone Stranger and Porky" (1939/Clampett):
  • "My Little Buckaroo" (1938): The horses and stage coatch piling up on each other.

    "Porky's Movie Mystery" (1939/Clampett):
  • "The Blow Out" (1936): Animation of the police cars heading for the camera and the phantom sneaking around.
  • "The Coo-Coo Nut Grove" (1936): Animation of Hugh Herbet.
  • "Injun Trouble" (1938): Animation of the ax being swung at Porky.

    "Chicken Jitters" (1939/Clampett):
  • "Porky's Poultry Plant" (1936): Porky's worm-charming scene.
  • "Porky's Garden" (1937): Sequence where a chicken splits an apple to get the worm out of it.

    "Polar Pals" (1939/Clampett):
  • "Injun Trouble" (1938): The "spitting" musket sequence.

    "Bars and Stripes Forever" (1939/Hardaway-Dalton):
  • "I'm a Big Shot Now" (1936): Some animation sequences with the cops shooting at the criminal.

    "Wise Quacks" (1939/Clampett):
  • "I Wish I Had Wings" (1932): The opening animation of Mrs. Daffy (in the hen's place) hiding something from Daffy (in the rooster's place).
  • "Chicken Jitters" (1939): Animation of Mrs. Daffy walking with her ducklings and the sequence with the duckling hatching from the egg.
  • "Porky's Poultry Plant" (1936): Animation of the vultures.

    "Scalp Trouble" (1939/Clampett):
  • "Sweet Sioux" (1937): Animation of the Indians running out of tents and the sequence with the Indians running toward the camera.
  • "Injun Trouble" (1938): The "spitting" musket sequence.
  • "Little Beau Porky" (1936): Animation of the soldiers getting ready for battle.
  • "The Lone Stranger and Porky" (1939): Animation of the Lone Stranger (here redrawn as an Indian) lifting up his rear to sit on his horse.

    "Porky's Picnic" (1939/Clampett):
  • "Porky's Naughty Nephew" (1938): Animation of Pinkie skipping.
  • "Bosko and Bruno" (1932): Animation of the train.

    "Porky's Hotel" (1939/Clampett):
  • "Porky and Daffy" (1938): Animation of the pelican.

    "Sioux Me" (1939/Hardaway-Dalton):
  • "Porky the Rain Maker" (1936): Tons of animation (and the plot as well accept with different characters) is recycled from this cartoon.

    "Jeepers Creepers" (1939/Clampett):
  • "The Case of the Stuttering Pig" (1937): Animation of Porky running up the stairs.

    "Naughty Neighbors" (1939/Clampett):
  • "Boom Boom" (1936): Animation of the bombs flying everyplace and the sequence where one character shoots a machine gun and becomes "shakey".
  • "What Price Porky?" (1938): Scene with the mother hen preparing her eggs for war.

    "Pied Piper Porky" (1939/Clampett):
  • "Porky in Wackyland" (1938): The scene where Porky runs into the mouse and cat and crashes into a cloumn with his hat ending up on his rear.

    "The Film Fan" (1939/Clampett):
  • "The Daffy Doc" (1938): Porky walking down the street and flipping a coin.
  • "The Lone Stranger and Porky" (1939): The Lone Stranger sequence.
  • "She Was an Acrobat's Daughter" (1937): Several theater sequences.


    1940s


    "Porky's Last Stand" (1940/Clampett):
  • "The Daffy Doc" (1938): The sequence involving Daffy walking while holding a mallet behind his back.

    "Africa Squeaks" (1940/Clampett):
  • "The Isle of Pingo-Pongo" (1938): The scene where two big, obese African natives dance with each other.


    "The Isle of Pingo-Pongo" (left), "Africa Squeaks" (right)


    "Ali Baba Bound" (1940/Clampett):
  • "Buddy of the Apes" (1934): The shot of the African natives (here redrawn as Ali Baba's men) running toward the camera.

    "Porky's Poor Fish" (1940/Clampett):
  • "Porky's Five and Ten" (1938): Animation of the dancing octopus.
  • "What Price Porky?" (1938): The hen (here redrawn as a tuna) preparing her eggs for war.

    "Slap-Happy Pappy" (1940/Clampett):
  • "Plenty of Money and You" (1937): Animation of the chickens scratching around for food.

    "The Chewin' Bruin" (1940/Clampett):
  • "Injun Trouble" (1938): Animation of the wimpering bear trap running away.

    "Porky's Baseball Broadcast" (1940/Freleng):
  • "Boulevardier from the Bronx" (1936): Animation of the fast-talking turtle catcher, the Babe Ruth pig, and the base-stretching dachshund.


    "Boulevardier from the Bronx" (left), "Porky's Baseball Broadcast" (right)


    "The Hardship of Miles Standish" (1940/Freleng):
  • "Sweet Sioux" (1937): Animation of the Indians running toward the camera.

    "Patient Porky" (1940/Clampett):
  • "The Daffy Doc" (1938): Animation of the nurses at the opening and Daffy (here redrawn as a cock-eyed cat) punching the oxygen bag and chasing Porky with a saw.


    "The Daffy Doc" (left), "Patient Porky" (right)


    "Malibu Beach Party" (1940/Freleng):
  • "September in the Rain" (1937): Sequence with the rotoscoped Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers.

    "A Gander At Mother Goose" (1940/Avery):
  • "Detouring America" (1939): Animation of the soldiers marching.


    "Detouring America" (left), "A Gander At Mother Goose" (right)


    "Circus Today" (1940/Avery):
  • "The Lyin' Mouse" (1938): The "lion tamer" act.

    "The Sour Puss" (1940/Clampett):
  • "Porky's Poor Fish" (1940): Animation of the frustrated cat thinking.
  • "Porky's Naughty Nephew" (1938): Animation of the shark.

    "The Timid Toreador" (1940/Clampett-McCabe):
  • "Little Pancho Vanilla" (1938): Animation of the crowd throwing up their hats.
  • "The Coo-Coo Nut Grove" (1936): Porky as Oliver Hardy.

    "Shop, Look, and Listen" (1940/Freleng):
  • "Little Blabbermouse" (1940): Animation of the tour starting.
  • "Have You Got Any Castles?" (1938): Some animation pieces of "Whistler's Mother".

    "The Haunted Mouse" (1941/Avery):
  • "Of Fox and Hounds" (1940): Animation of Willoughby (here redrawn as a dumb cat) running.

    "The Crackpot Quail" (1941/Avery):
  • "Of Fox and Hounds" (1940): Animation of Willoughby running.

    "Goofy Groceries" (1941/Clampett):
  • "Slap-Happy Pappy" (1940): Animation of Jack Bunny turning to the camera to introduce himself.
  • "How Do I Know It's Sunday?" (1934): The "By a Waterfall" sequence.
  • "Chicken Jitters" (1939): Porky (here redrawn as Jack Bunny) running with an ax.

    "Aviation Vacation" (1941/Avery):
  • "Ceiling Hero" (1940): Sequence with the plane shadow following the road.

    "We, the Animals, Squeak!" (1941/Clampett):
  • "Pied Piper Porky" (1939): Animation of Kansas City Kitty jumping up on a stool holding up her skirt and shooing away the mouse.


    "Pied Piper Porky" (left), "We, the Animals, Squeak!" (right)


    "Sport Chumpions" (1941/Freleng):
  • "Screwball Football" (1939): The animation of the football players all piling up on each other.

    "The Henpecked Duck" (1941/Clampett):
  • "Chicken Jitters" (1939): Animation of the duckling hatching from the egg.

    "Notes to You" (1941/Freleng):
  • "Calling Dr. Porky" (1940): The scene where the drunk (here the cat) opens the door on Porky.

    "The Bird Came C.O.D." (1942/Jones):
  • "Stage Fright" (1940): Some animation of the small, tough bird from the top hat is reused from this cartoon.

    "Who's Who in the Zoo?" (1942/McCabe):
  • "Prehistoric Porky" (1940): Some animation of the vulture is reused from this cartoon.

    "Crazy Crusie" (1942/Avery-Clampett):
  • "Africa Squeaks" (1940): The scene where the deer (here redrawn as rabbits) fight back using "Air Raid" against the vulture (here Japanese).


    "Africa Squeaks" (left), "Crazy Cruise" (right)


    "Nutty News" (1942/Clampett):
  • "Chicken Jitters" (1939): The father duck taking his ducklings for a walk.
  • "Of Fox and Hounds" (1940): A few fox hunting gags are reused from this short.

    "Lights Fantastic" (1942/Freleng):
  • "Goofy Groceries" (1941): Animation of the can-can tomatoes.

    "The Hep Cat" (1942/Clampett):
  • "Any Bonds Today?" (1942): Animation of Bugs (redrawn here as the cat) doing the splits.

    "Tortise Wins By a Hare" (1943/Clampett):
  • "The Heckling Hare" (1941): The scene where Bugs Bunny puts on his bathing cap. The only bit that is composited of new animation is Bugs twisting his ears before putting on the bathing cap (he flattens them in "The Heckling Hare").

    "Coal Black and De Sebben Dwarfs" (1943/Clampett):
  • "The Isle of Pingo-Pongo" (1938): The sequence where the natives (here redrawn as So White and Prince Chawmin') start to waltz.

    "Tin Pan Alley Cats" (1943/Clampett):
  • "September in the Rain" (1937): Animation of Fats Waller playing the piano, Louis Armstrong singing "Nagasaki" and playing the trumpet, the black caricatures on the ham packages singing the chorus, and Aunt Jemima dancing. All characters are slightly modified to look like cats.
  • "Porky in Wackyland" (1938): The wackyland sequence, the cat-dog character, and the elevator gag (with the Do-Do replaced by a black caricature).


    "September in the Rain" (left), "Tin Pan Alley Cats" (right)



    "Porky in Wackyland" (left), "Tin Pan Alley Cats" (right)


    "Tick Tock Tuckered" (1944/Clampett):
  • "Porky's Badtime Story" (1937): "Tick Tock Tuckered" is a remake of this cartoon, therefore a good majority of the animation is reused from it.
  • "Notes to You" (1941): Animation of Porky throwing the book out the window and the book returning.

    "Slighty Daffy" (1944/Freleng):
  • "Scalp Trouble" (1939): "Slighty Daffy" is a remake of this cartoon, therefore a good majority of the animation is reused from it.
  • "Johnny Smith and Poker-Huntas" (1938): The "look-out" sequence.
  • "Porky's Phony Express" (1938): Animation of the goofy Indian and the Indian on the bike.
  • "The Hardship of Miles Standish" (1940): Indians shooting arrows from behind rocks.




    "Scalp Trouble" (left), "Slighty Daffy" (right)


    "Hare Ribbin'" (1944/Clampett):
  • "The Hep Cat" (1942): In the director's cut of "Hare Ribbin'", the "Bert Gordon" dog starts panting when he sees Bugs in mermaid drag. This is actually reused from "The Hep Cat" where the "goil-crazy" black cat pants when he sees a sexy female cat.

    "A Gruesome Twosome" (1945/Clampett):
  • "Birdy and the Beast" (1944): Animation of Tweety meeting the dumb cat.

    "Wagon Heels" (1945/Clampett):
  • "Injun Trouble" (1938): "Wagon Heels" is a remake of this cartoon, therefore a good majority of the animation is reused from it. Some modifications were made such as Injun Joe's face being seen in the original and being covered with hair in the remake.
  • "A Tale of Two Kitties" (1942): The landing impact sequence.

    "The Bashful Buzzard" (1945/Clampett):
  • "Bugs Bunny Gets the Boid" (1942): The opening sequence.

    "Book Revue" (1946/Clampett):
  • "A Coy Decoy" (1941): Animation of the opening scene showing the book shop.

    "The Great Piggy Bank Robbery" (1946/Clampett):
  • "Baby Bottleneck" (1946): Animation of Daffy answering the phone.

    "Becall to Arms" (1946/Clampett):
  • "She Was an Acrobat's Daughter" (1937): Several theater sequences.

    "Of Thee I Sting" (1946/Freleng):
  • "Target: Snafu" (1944/Private Snafu): Several sequences including the "obsticle course", "fight tatics", and "preparation" scenes.


    "Target: Snafu" (left), "Of Thee I Sting" (right)


    "The Big Snooze" (1946/Clampett):
  • "All This and Rabbit Stew" (1941): Animation of the "log gag" where Bugs leads Sambo (here redrawn as Elmer) off a cliff.






    "All This and Rabbit Stew" (left), "The Big Snooze" (right)


    "I Taw a Putty Tat" (1948/Freleng):
  • "Puss N' Booty" (1943): Animation of Sylvester's mistress calling the pet shop.

    "Bugs Bunny Rides Again" (1948/Feleng):
  • "Hare Trigger" (1945): Animation of Bugs rolling his cigarette before excepting Sam's invitation to face off.
  • "Stage Door Cartoon" (1944): Animation by Gerry Chiniquy of Bugs's soft shoe seems to be partially reused from this cartoon.


    "Hare Trigger" (left), "Bugs Bunny Rides Again" (right)


    "Kit for Kat" (1948/Freleng):
  • "Life with Feathers" (1945): Opening sequence with Sylvester picking through garbage cans.

    "Knights Must Fall" (1949/Freleng):
  • "Rabbit Transit" (1947): Animation of Bugs running extremely fast then diving into his hole.

    "Dough for the Do-Do" (1949/Freleng):
  • "Porky in Wackyland" (1938): "Dough for the Do-Do" is a remake of this cartoon, therefore a good majority of the animation is reused from it.
  • "Tin Pan Alley Cats" (1944): The "rubber band" sequence.








    "Porky in Wackyland" (left), "Dough for the Do-Do" (right)



    1950s


    "Tweety's S.O.S." (1951/Freleng):
  • "Life with Feathers" (1945): Opening sequence with Sylvester picking through garbage cans.


    "Life with Feathers" (left), "Tweety's S.O.S." (right)


    "Foxy By Proxy" (1952/Freleng):
  • "Of Fox and Hounds" (1940): Opening sequence.

    "Beep, Beep" (1952/Jones):
  • "Fast and Furry-Ous" (1949): The Road Runner's freeze frame introduction (minus Wile E.'s).

    "Ant Pasted" (1953/Freleng):
  • "Target: Snafu" (1944/Private Snafu) and "Of Thee I Sting" (1946): "Air Force" ants sequences.
  • "Bad Ol' Putty Tat" (1949): Sequence with Sylvester (here redrawn as Elmer) drinking water from the tank and "exploding" into it.

    "Tom Tom Tomcat" (1953/Freleng):
  • "A Mouse Divided" (1953): Animation of the cats ramming the door down with a huge log then getting shot by a cannon.
  • "Gift Wrapped" (1952): Scene where one of the cats catches Tweety with a plunger-arrow.

    "Robot Rabbit" (1953/Freleng):
  • "Rabbit Every Monday" (1951): Animation of Bugs getting shook up in a sieve.

    "Dog Pounded" (1954/Freleng):
  • "Ain't She Tweet" (1952): The scene involving Sylvester entering the dog pound then scrambling out, panting.

    "Sahara Hare" (1955/Freleng):
  • "Frigid Hare" (1949): Animation Bugs "flying" out of his rabbit hole yelling, "Miami beach at last!"

    "Stupor Duck" (1956/McKimson):
  • "Hare Trigger" (1945): Animation of the old-fashioned train.

    "A Star is Bored" (1956/Freleng):
  • "Sandy Claws" (1955): The fishing gag is reused from this cartoon with Daffy in Sylvester's place.

    "Wideo Wabbit" (1956/McKimson):
  • "Rhapsody Rabbit" (1946): Animation of Bugs playing the piano.


    "Rhapsody Rabbit" (left), "Wideo Wabbit" (right)


    "Bedevilled Rabbit" (1957/McKimson):
  • "Devil May Hare" (1954): Animation of the animals escaping Taz.




    "Devil May Hare" (left), "Bedevilled Rabbit" (right)


    "Show Biz Bugs" (1957/Freleng):
  • "Curtain Razor" (1949): The sequence with the training pigeons.

    "Dog Tales" (1958/McKimson):
  • "Foxy By Proxy" (1952): Animation of the pack of dogs going nuts.
  • "Often an Orphan" (1949): Animation of Charlie Dog.
  • "Piker's Peak" (1957): Animation of the St. Bernard Dog.

    "A Pizza Tweety Pie" (1958/Freleng):
  • "Tugboat Granny" (1956): The deflating raft gag.

    "A Mutt in a Rut" (1959/McKimson):
  • "Don't Give Up The Sheep" (1953): The wildcat sequence, with Elmer in place of Sam Sheepdog.

    "Here Today, Gone Tamale" (1959/Freleng):
  • "Speedy Gonzales" (1955): Scene where Speedy running through a pipe and then through Sylvester's tail.

    "Bonanza Bunny" (1959/McKimson):
  • A lot of animation from "Bunker Hill Bunny" (1950), "Bugs Bunny Rides Again" (1948), and "Drip-Along Daffy" (1951) is reused in this film.

    "A Broken Leghorn" (1959/McKimson):
  • "Of Rice And Hen" (1953): Animation of the hens coming out of their henhouse.

    "People Are Bunny" (1959/McKimson):
  • "Wideo Wabbit" (1956): Bugs as an usher leading Daffy into "Indian Massacre at Buton's Bend" as well as Bugs dressing Daffy in a rabbit suit are reused from this cartoon with Daffy in Elmer's place.


    1960s


    "Person to Bunny" (1960/Freleng):
  • "Show Biz Bugs" (1957): Daffy's tap-dancing number.
  • "Foxy By Proxy" (1952): The log gag.

    "Trip for Tat" (1960/Freleng):
  • "Tweety's S.O.S." (1951): The scenes that take place in the boat.
  • "Tree Cornered Tweety" (1956): The scene where Sylvester chases Tweety by skiing and the scene with the wooden bridge and fisherman.
  • "Tweet, Tweet, Tweety" (1951): Sylvester tries to catch Tweety via swing.
  • "A Pizza Tweety Pie" (1958): The final scene where Sylvester decides to stay at the Italian resturant and eat spagetti.

    "The Last Hungry Cat" (1961/Freleng):
  • "Lighthouse Mouse" (1955): Animation of Sylvester taking sleeping pills.

    "Crow's Feat" (1962/Freleng):
  • "Two Crows from Tacos" (1956): Scene where the Mexicali crows, Manuel and Jose' jump and Manuel's sombrero becomes a "parachute".


    "Two Crows from Tacos" (left), "Crow's Feat" (right)


    "Devil's Feud Cake" (1963/Freleng):
  • "The Bugs Bunny Show: Episode #1625: Satan's Waitin'" (1961): The "new" filler animation is reused from this episode of "The Bugs Bunny Show".

    "Hare-Breadth Hurry" (1963/Jones):
  • "Hip- Hip- Hurry!" (1958): Animation of the rolling road, the tunnels turning inside-out, and the electricity panels.

    "Chili Weather" (1963/Freleng):
  • "I Gopher You" (1954): Shots of all the vegetables on the assembly line.
  • "Speedy Gonzales" (1955): The mice looking into the factory through the fence.

    "Dr. Devil and Mr. Hare" (1964/McKimson):
  • "Devil May Hare" (1954): Animation of the animals escaping Taz.

    "Hawaiian Aye Aye" (1964/Freleng):
  • "Tugboat Granny" (1956): The deflating raft gag.

    "Pancho's Hideaway" (1964/Freleng-Pratt):
  • "Mexican Boarders" (1962): Animation of Speedy running out of his hole.

    "Road to Andalay" (1964/Freleng-Pratt):
  • "Mexican Boarders" (1962): Animation of Speedy running out of his hole.
  • "The Jet Cage" (1962): Animation of Sylvester falling.


    "The Jet Cage" (left), "Road to Andalay" (right)


    "Cats and Bruises" (1965/Freleng-Pratt):
  • "Here Today, Gone Tamale" (1959): Scene with Sylvester dancing with the other mice, disguised as a "giant mouse". Also reused is the entire sequence where Sylvester captures Speedy with a net, is dragged everywhere, including up and down flights of stairs and finally, getting ready to clout Speedy, gets smashed by a heavy object.
  • "The Pied Piper Guadalupe" (1961): Animation of one of the mice carrying a "Loco El Gato" sign. The scene where Sylvester's hot rod goes into the lake, sputters, and then zooms out is also reused.
  • "Ain't She Tweet" (1952): Scene where Sylvester goes into the dog pound then runs out panting.
  • "Canary Row" (1950): The entire catapault/weight sequence is reused from this cartoon with Speedy in place of Tweety.
  • "Tugboat Granny" (1956): The deflating raft gag.


    "Canary Row" (left), "Cats and Bruises" (right)


    "The Wild Chase" (1965/Freleng-Pratt):
  • "Zoom and Bored" (1957): Scene with Wile E. running into a large patch of dust, then realizing he's stepped off a cliff and falling.
  • "Wild About Hurry" (1959): The iron-pellets-in-bird seed/hand-grenade-on-a-roller-skate-magnet gag is reused from this cartoon as well as the gag about the rock that Wile E. drops which doesn't fall until he starts jumping up and down on it.
  • "Hopalong Casualty" (1960): The dynamite and the backfiring detonator gag.


    "Zoom and Bored" (left), "The Wild Chase" (right)


    "Rushing Roulette" (1965/McKimson):
  • "Adventures of the Road-Runner" (1962): The animation of Wile E. Coyote falling down a canyon. It was also reused in "Sugar and Spies" (1966).

    "Go Go Amigo" (1965/McKimson):
  • "Here Today, Gone Tamale" (1959): Animation of Speedy dancing. It was also used in "Cats and Bruises".


    "Here Today, Gone Tamale" (left), "Cats and Bruises" (center), "Go Go Amigo" (right)


    Rudy Larriva Road Runner cartoons (1965-66):
  • To conserve money, Warner Bros. farmed out a series of Road Runner cartoons to Herbert Klynn at Format Films. All eleven films were directed by Rudy Larriva and each reused three specific sequences continously. These included 1) the sequence of Wile E. Coyote chasing the Road Runner; 2) the Road Runner running over the horizon; and 3) the Road Runner beeping for joy. In addition to this, the Bill Lava "desert" musical score was used and recycled for these Larriva Road Runners.



    "Mucho Locos" (1966/McKimson):
  • The clips from "Robin Hood Daffy", "Tortilla Flaps", "Deduce You Say", "Mexicali Shomoes", and "China Jones" in this DePatie-Freleng cheater aren't reused footage but retraced from the actual animation sheets (a crude method of "restoration").

    "A-Haunting We Will Go" (1966/McKimson):
  • "Broom-Stick Bunny" (1956): Animation of Speedy as Witch Hazel.
  • "Duck Amuck" (1953): Animation of Daffy transforming into a strange flower-headed creature.

    "Sugar and Spies" (1966/McKimson):
  • "Adventures of the Road-Runner" (1962): The animation of Wile E. Coyote falling down a canyon. It was also reused in "Rushing Roulette" (1965).


    Miscellaneous Reused Animation


    "Two Guys from Texas" (1948/Live-action Warner Bros. film/animated sequence with Bugs Bunny cameo):
  • "The Swooner Crooner" (1944): During the animated sequence, one of the characters sings "Everyday I Love You Just a Little Bit More" and all of the sheep swoon. The animation of the sheep swooning is actually reused animation of the chickens swooning from "The Swooner Crooner".

    "The Bugs Bunny Show: Episode #1575" (1960/Jones-Freleng):
  • "Duck Amuck" (1953): Animation of Daffy as a Hawaiian dancer and Musketeer.
  • "Show Biz Bugs" (1957): Daffy's tap-dancing number.


    The Bugs Bunny Show (left), "Duck Amuck" (right)


    "The Bugs Bunny Show: Episode #1590" (1961/Jones-Freleng):
  • "Back Alley Op-roar" (1948): Sylvester's Hungarian Rhapsody number.

    "The Bugs Bunny Show: Episode #1592" (1961/Jones-Freleng):
  • "A Bear for Punishment" (1951): Mama Bear's dance, "I'm Just Wild About Daffy" is actually reused animation from "A Bear for Punishment" when she performs "I'm Just Wild About Father".

    "The Bugs Bunny Show: Episode #1596" (1961/Jones-Freleng):
  • "Mexicali Shmoes" (1959): Some animation pieces of the cats Manuel and Jose.

    "The Adventures of the Road Runner" (1962/Jones)
  • "Gee Whiz-z-z-z!" (1956): The "Acme Batman Outfit" ("Guranteed the Life of the User") sequence.
  • Episode also includes reused animation from "Hip- Hip- Hurry!" (1958), "Zip N' Snort" (1961), "Stop, Look, and Hasten" (1954), and "To Beep or Not to Beep" (1963).

    "Bugs Bunny's 3rd Movie: 1001 Rabbit Tales" (1982/Freleng-Detiege):
  • "Ali Baba Bunny" (1957): Daffy stuffing Bugs into the hole to get to Sultan Sam's palace.

    "Happy Birthday Bugs: 50 Looney Years" (1990/Smith):
  • Animation is reused here from both previous late-1980s Ford-Lennon specials: Elmer as "Mr. X" is reused from "Bugs Bunny's Wild World of Sports" and Daffy watching TV is reused from "Bugs vs. Daffy: Battle of the Music Video Stars".

    "Bugs Bunny's Overtures to Disaster" (1991/Ford):
  • "The Bugs Bunny Show: Episode #1590" (1960): Animation of Elmer attempting to conduct. Sylvester's Hungarian Rhapsody is again reused from "Back Alley Op-roar", it was reused here mainly because Warner's still did not have the rights to their pre-1948 library of animated films. So, to avoid any legal disputes between WB and Turner (who owned the films until the 1995 Time-Warner/Turner merger), Ford and his staff decided to reanimated the sequence.


    This guide was written and compiled by Pietro Shakarian. Thanks to Jon Cooke, David Gerstein, Matthew Hunter, and Jack Tatay for providing some key information for which this guide would not be complete without. Also a special thanks to Rodeny Bowcock, Anthony DiPaola, Bart Kasper, Thad Komorowski, Martin Juneau, Larry Tremblay, Matt Yorston, "The Crazy HR," and other posters from
    The Termite Terrace Trading Post.

    All Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies characters and images Warner Bros.
    Textual content the author, with all rights reserved
    This article, the observations, and the ideas therein are the intellectual property of the author unless otherwise noted and may not be reproduced and then altered in any way without the express written consent of the author, and any scholarly quoting, paraphrasing, or other repetition of them MUST be accompanied by full stated credit to the author, with failure to do so possibly exposing an individual or group to litigation and possible civil or criminal penalty


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